Lee Lawrie: Art Déco Master Sculptor

One United States’ foremost architectural sculptors and a key figure in the American art scene preceding World War II

 


Atlas 1937

Rockefeller Center NYC

“Wisdom”

Above Entrance @ 30, Rockefeller Plaza NYC

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'Wisdom', Lee Lawrie, Rockefeller Centre, 1939

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Parade of Sorrows 1931

Saint Paul City Hall and Ramsey County Courthouse

Minnesota USA

Parade of sorrows


Library of Congress John Adams Building (1939)

East doors

 


“The Story of Mankind” (1937)

 Carved limestone screen 
 International Building, 630 Fifth Avenue, New York City
 
 
  
Bottom center: Four stereotypical figures depicting the races of mankind: red, white, yellow and black.
Above them is a sailing ship symbolizing international trade.
Above that are three male figures representing art, science and industry. And above that is the mythological messenger god, Mercury, symbolizing communication and trade. 





 
At the top, the earth is represented by a clock and its rays. It is flanked by the two hemispheres, represented by the Big Dipper and the Southern Cross. The regions are represented by a seagull and whale’s fluke for the North, palm trees for the South, a mosque for the East, and an Aztec temple for the West. A Norman tower represents agrarianism, and three smokestacks represent the new industrial age. The kingdoms of the world are represented by a lion, and the republics are represented by an eagle.

 



 Courage

carved stone panels along with Patriotism and Wisdom

 US Senate chambers


Nebraska State Capitol

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Judgment of Solomon

Judgment of Solomon (by Lee Lawrie).jpg
By Einar Einarsson Kvaran Carptrash  CC BY-SA 3.0

 


 Yale Law School

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Nabu and Tahmurath (1939)

Library of Congress


Winged Mercury 1933

United Nations Plaza, New York

Winged Mercury by Lee Lawrie, 1933, United Nations Plaza, New York


Beaumont Tower

Michigan State University

Beaumont Tower - Lee Lawrie, sculptor

The Sower (1922)

A bas-relief with the inscription “Whatsoever a Man Soweth” (Galatians 6:7)

A tribute both to MSU’s origins as an agricultural college and to the seminal nature of knowledge.





 


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